Monthly Dharma Quotation: Vision of the Mahayana

As our view of the world changes, it becomes possible to love others in a way that we previously reserved for ourselves alone. This genuine love is self-existent, beyond all contrivance and manipulation. It arises spontaneously, simply because the obstacles to its arising have been removed. Consequently, we can’t command…

Continue reading

Monthly Newsletter for January

Monthly Dharma Quotation: The Ungraspable Self As you begin to allow thoughts and feelings to be there, the mind often seems to become more, rather than less, irritating. It is not really becoming more irritating, the fact is, it was always like that, and you are just becoming more and…

Continue reading

Monthly Dharma Quotation: A Feeling for Truth

How can we know we are genuinely relating to direct experience rather than just fooling ourselves? The only way to tell is by feeling the general direction of your practice. If egocentricity and attachment seem to be increasing as you practice, you’re probably following the wrong path. On the other…

Continue reading

Monthly Dharma Quotation: On The Importance of Teachers

Nobody can tell you, “Reality is like this!” or “Read my book for a complete explanation of all the secrets of the universe.” The truth has to be perceived directly, which is why even buddhas can never really communicate it to others. It isn’t that they don’t want to; we…

Continue reading

Monthly Dharma Quotation: On Feeling Guilty

Opinions, emotions, prejudices and ideas change, but even so they are still what we identify with. We think all this is ‘me,’ but actually it is just something that arises within that space [of] awareness and sensitivity. It is just a feature of that. The person in charge is not…

Continue reading

Monthly Dharma Quotation: On the Power of Superstition

This month’s quotation is from a teaching Rigdzin Shikpo gave on Refuge and Bodhisattva vows. The entire teaching is made available to students who prepare to go for refuge with Rigdzin Shikpo. Some practice traditions are based on a kind of superstition in making bold statements like “May I die…

Continue reading